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Prostate Cancer Awareness Takes Center Stage

Sep 21, 2016Health Focus, Health Matters for Women

“Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in the U.S. and the second leading cause of cancer death in men.”

It’s a difficult subject to think and talk about. But at some point, men at age 50—as that’s when most prostate issues begin to surface—should start talking to their doctor about screening for prostate cancer.

The prostate is a small gland located below your bladder and in front of your rectum. This gland surrounds the tube that transports urine from the bladder out of your body. As a man’s prostate gland increases in size, it grows outward, making it difficult to urinate. There can be several reasons for this.

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in the U.S. and the second leading cause of cancer death in men, according to the American Cancer Society. And because age and genetics—two things you can’t control—are the most common risk factors, it’s important to get screened by a urologist if you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • Blood in the urine or bone pain or tenderness, most often in the lower back and pelvic bones
  • Delayed or slowed start of urinary stream
  • Leakage of urine after urinating
  • Slow urinary stream

Since cancer isn’t the only prostate concern, urologists will usually conduct a bevy of tests to ensure something else isn’t causing the symptoms.

An enlarged prostate—benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH)—is another common occurrence in men over 50. Many times, the symptoms associated with BPH are similar to those associated with prostate cancer. In addition, urgency or not being able to urinate could be a sign of a urinary tract infection. Blood in urine could mean a bladder stone or bladder cancer, or symptoms could also indicate a condition called prostatitis—a catchall word for an inflammation of the prostate gland.

A large majority of men will deal with prostate enlargement in their lifetime, and, if left untreated, some symptoms can have long-term effects. That’s why it’s so important to talk to your doctor about any symptoms and get yearly screenings.

We’re Here for You

David M. Sisul, MD, a highly-trained urologist at Bingham Memorial Urology, sees both male and female patients suffering from incontinence, overactive bladders, blood in the urine, kidney stones, and cancer. He provides the latest treatments, and sees patients in Blackfoot & Idaho Falls. If you or a loved one have any questions, consultations can be scheduled by calling (208) 535-3626.