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Emergency Services

At Bingham Memorial Hospital, we have Emergency Services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Our Emergency Room is staffed by board-certified emergency physicians. 

When someone you love is sick or injured, time takes on a whole new meaning. At Bingham Memorial, we offer one of the most important services required in an emergency—time—when you need it most. Our emergency department is designed to deal with serious emergencies as well as less urgent conditions.

Our Emergency Department is designed to deal with serious emergencies as well as less urgent conditions. Please find following some Frequently Asked Questions that will help you understand your visit to the Bingham Memorial Hospital Emergency Department.

FAQ

When Should I Visit the Emergency Room at Bingham?

Our emergency department is designed to deal with serious emergencies as well as less urgent conditions, such as:

  • Allergic Reactions
  • Breaks
  • Fevers
  • Flu Symptoms
  • Minor Injuries from Accidents
  • Respiratory Illnesses
  • Sinus Infections
  • Sprains
  • Stitches

What Happens When I Arrive in the Emergency Department?

If you arrive at the hospital in a life-threatening condition, you will be taken directly to the treatment area. A registration clerk will verify your home address and telephone number shortly after you come into the Emergency Department. You will not be asked for insurance information until after the doctor sees you and evaluates your condition.

If your condition is not life-threatening, you will be triaged by a nurse.

What is Triage?

The process of determining the seriousness of your condition is called “triage.” During the triage process, you will be seen by a triage nurse who will begin a chart for your visit. The nurse will ask you questions regarding the reason for your visit, your medical history, any medications you are taking and any allergies to medications. You will also be asked to give consent for treatment in the Emergency Department.

Your blood pressure, heart rate, temperature and other measurements will help the nurse decide how quickly you should be seen. The nurse may begin treating you before you see a doctor or send you to get an X-ray or lab work to help move your care along. You may be asked a second time for your medical history – many times, patients remember information better when asked again. The Emergency Department staff strives to make the best decisions based on both your condition and medical history.

How Long Should I Expect to be in the Emergency Department?

Your wait time depends on many things, especially how many patients are in the Emergency Department and the urgency of their condition. Top priority is given to patients in a life-threatening situation, as well as those who arrive by ambulance. You may be asked to have a seat in the waiting area before being taken to a treatment area. We understand that you are visiting the Emergency Department because you’re experiencing pain and that you deserve to be seen quickly. We work hard to make your wait as short as possible and will provide you with frequent updates in your wait time.

How Much Should I Expect to be Charged for Visiting the Emergency Department?

Your bill from the Emergency Department will be based upon the severity of your condition. To determine the level of care you received, we use an “Emergency Room Patient Classification System,” which will appear on your statement, along with any used medical equipment and supplies. You will also be charged for the doctor’s services. If you received an x-ray, CT scan, ultrasound or lab work, there will be a separate bill from the radiology doctor or laboratory.

How Does Discharging from the Emergency Department Work?

The nurse will give you discharge instructions. If you are prescribed medication, the doctor will review it with you and answer any questions you may have.

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